Study at Reykjavik University



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Our international students describe their RU experiences.

Reykjavik University, 2017

Reykjavik University is very closely
connected to the industry of Iceland. This gives our students a unique opportunity in
a very close-knit, advanced, developed industrial society to have access to industry, specialists and
opportunities that very few universities can offer. I really like the place. Everybody is very nice
and is always willing to help you. I selected Iceland mainly because
of Iceland itself, because of the nature. But on the other hand the
school is also very good. It’s a very high
energy environment. We have geothermal and
we also have a lot of water because it rains a lot,
hence hydropower. And there is
also a lot of wind. It’s an opportunity for me to learn a number of
innovative renewable energy technologies and be able to utilize
them when I go back home. In corporate finance we are few people,
small classes and a lot of discussions. A lot of interaction between students and teachers.
So it has a personal feel to it. Here in the computer science department
there is a very advanced course Here in the computer science department
there is a very advanced course for game design and virtual environments.
So that’s the main reason that brought us here. Classes are a lot smaller here and
you have a lot more regular assignments like group work
and presentations. I feel that there is a much more direct
relationship between teacher and student. With much more dialog which
can really help improve your studying. We really sit down with our students
and we tailor the program to each student. Our primary purpose is to educate the
specialists and the leaders of the future. I’m working in the subfield of mathematics
called combinatorics and I work with quite simple
mathematical objects. We’re teaching the computer how to prove
things about these mathematical objects. This is very new. You have study spaces
you have lecture halls and you also have a very nice
library where I study a lot. I think it’s really advanced, a lot of
access to innovative and modern stuff that really makes learning
and studying easier. It’s been really nice. We have met
a lot of different people and we are always doing
something. We have full schedules. We live in the capital and
there is always something to do a lot of cultural events, dancing and places
to meet people and just hang out. At one point it was
a hard decision for me. But when I came here then I knew it was the
right decision. So I’m very happy here. Something that I really liked
was that it was Iceland. So it was perfect, I could study and come
to an amazing place at the same time.

The best place to be a woman? | The Economist



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In the battle for gender equality Iceland is leading the world. The tiny island is pioneering news ways to close the gender pay gap, root out stereotypes and get more mothers back to work.

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Supported by Mishcon de Reya

Today women around the globe have less access to power wealth and education than men – but one tiny island is leading the world in bridging these gaps. Iceland is pioneering ways to get more mothers back to work, to root out gender stereotypes, and to close the pay gap.

Could Iceland inspire the world to solve one of its greatest problems?

Iceland has topped gender equality rankings for nearly a decade. One of the secrets to their success? Start early. This kindergarten in the capital Reykjavik focuses on challenging extreme gender stereotypes before they take root in boys and girls. It’s a mission that’s led to the creation of 17 schools across this tiny country – all focused on developing a healthy balance of characteristics in both sexes. Girls and boys are separated to allow girls to nurture traits traditionally viewed as masculine, like being bold, independent, and taking risks. And boys are given time to learn traits traditionally viewed as feminine, like being more group oriented, empathetic, and caring – and the signs are that this is working. Research suggests that in later years children from this school have a greater understanding of gender equality when compared to children from other schools.

Iceland is also promoting gender equality by encouraging fathers to share the childcare burden with mothers. In 2000, it introduced what is known as a daddy quota – three month statutory paternity leave. It’s an allowance that goes much further than most other countries in the world. Here over 70% of fathers take up the full three months leave. Why? Because the state covers 80% of a salary during this period up to a cap of $4,600 a month. One beneficiary of this generous system is Egill Bjarnson who is looking after his son Valer. Egill believes the high cost of the daddy quota to taxpayers is justified because it helps get more women into work.

But even in Iceland men are still paid nearly 6% more than women for similar work. This year Iceland became the first country in the world to pass legislation not just to expose but to tackle the gender pay gap. Companies with over 25 employees like Reykjavik Energy now have to prove they are paying men and women equally for similar jobs. Every job at the company must be measured against a set of criteria – this produces a score. For jobs with the same score workers must be paid the same. When Reykjavik Energy used this pay calculator the inequalities came into sharp and immediate focus.

The company rectified this by raising the wages of its female employees. Critics of the law point out there will be significant financial consequences for companies as they rectify their pay inequalities – but many argue this is a necessary price to pay. Gender equality will be an ever more pressing challenge for wealthy countries across the world. Could the ambitious measures being tested in Iceland provide practical solutions?

What are the forces shaping how people live and work and how power is wielded in the modern age? NOW AND NEXT reveals the pressures, the plans and the likely tipping points for enduring global change. Understand what is really transforming the world today – and discover what may lie in store tomorrow.

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today women around the globe have less access to power wealth and education than men but one tiny island is leading the world in bridging these gaps Iceland is pioneering ways to get more mothers back to work to root out gender stereotypes and to close the pay gap it's a human rights issue isn't it paying the same wage for equally valuable jobs could Iceland inspire the world to solve one of its greatest problems equality is absolutely the key to everything Iceland has topped gender equality rankings for nearly a decade one of the secrets to their success start early this kindergarten in the capital wreck of egg focuses on challenging extreme gender stereotypes before they take root in boys and girls for boys for example always be strong always decisive always taking charge they will enter bullying fighting breaking rules will do it with a curse as well if you're always helpful caring things about others always looking as a friend for acceptance you will have forgotten about yourself we need to get away from the extreme qualities we need to get more in the middle all of us it's a mission that's led to the creation of 17 schools across this tiny country all focused on developing a healthy balance of characteristics in both sexes girls and boys are separated to allow girls to nurture traits traditionally viewed as masculine like being bold independent and taking risks um boys are given time to learn traits traditionally viewed as feminine like being more group oriented empathetic and caring and the signs are that this is working research suggests that in later years children from this school have a greater understanding of gender equality when compared to children from other schools there is nothing like our quick fix to this shoots yes then at last we will catch Amish rest Iceland is also promoting gender equality by encouraging fathers to share the childcare burden with mothers in 2000 it introduced what is known as a daddy quota 3-month statutory paternity leave it's an allowance that goes much further than most other countries in the world here over 70% of fathers take up the full three months leave why because the state covers 80% of a salary during this period up to a cap of $4,600 a month one beneficiary of this generous system is Eagle be honest in' who is looking after his son Varla echo believes the high cost of the daddy quota to taxpayers is justified because it helps get more women into work imagine having some applicants from a man and a woman you need much less likely to take into the equation that the woman who could have a child in the future and go on a leave because the man is also going to do that so it does create a more equal field out there but even in Iceland men are still paid nearly 6% more than women for similar work this year Iceland became the first country in the world to pass legislation not just to expose but to tackle the gender pay gap companies with over 25 employees like Reykjavik Energy now have to prove they are paying men and women equally for similar jobs every job at the company must be measured against a set of criteria this produces a score for jobs with the same score workers must be paid the same when reykjavik energy used this pay calculator the inequalities came into sharp and immediate focus we noticed that there was a pay gap there between the unskilled workers that were outside and the unskilled workers inside the outside unskilled workers are mainly men and the unskilled workers inside that's the cleaning staff was that in the kitchen that's the mostly women what's important to keep in mind is the gender pay gap it's not there because there's a couple of evil men making decisions to pay women less it's this unconscious bias that we all have we place more value on traditionally male-dominated jobs the company rectified this by raising the wages of its female employees critics of the law point out there will be significant financial consequences for companies as they rectify their pay inequalities but many argue this is a necessary price to pay it's a human rights issue isn't it paying the same wage for equally valuable jobs having a law that requires company to have this it makes everyone a comfortable gender equality will be an ever more pressing challenge for wealthy countries across the world could the ambitious measures being tested in Iceland provide practical solutions you